Ending the NHL lockout: What will a compromise look like?

Well, it’s Day 9 of the NHL lockout, and there remains a distinct lack of urgency from the league and the NHLPA.

Even with 61 preseason games (and probably 1 per cent of hockey-related revenues) already wiped out, Gary Bettman and Donald Fehr have had hardly any negotiating sessions, prolonging a stalemate that appears its headed for at least December.

So if they’re not going to sit down and hammer this thing out, we’ll have to step in and act as an impartial mediator by putting together a compromise for both sides.

(In case you haven’t seen it, the two proposals currently on the table are spelled out in detail here.)

Those offers put the two sides at least $1-billion apart depending on how league revenues grow over the coming years, but there is a deal to be had somewhere in the middle of all this.

And the answer to how to settle this thing is with a new agreement neither side is going to like all that much.

Step 1: Let the players keep the $1.87-billion they earned last season – and not a penny more.

The union’s offer comes with a 2 per cent raise in Year 1, but it’s become clear in negotiations that that’s just not going to fly.

And the league wants players to take a big pay cut via escrow next season that won’t work either.

The players have dug in on this one, and it’s really not too much to ask in Year 1 of the deal. If NHL revenues grow at 6.3 per cent (which is roughly what they’ve averaged the last eight years minus the effects of the Canadian dollar), that $1.87-billion will drop the players’ share to 53.6 per cent.

And it’ll slowly trail down from there.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/sports/hockey/globe-on-hockey/ending-the-nhl-lockout-what-will-a-compromise-look-like/article4564194/

 


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